Trial document




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  DRKS00015760

Trial Description

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Title

Perceptual Timing in Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD):
From Lab to Life

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Trial Acronym

PETI-ADHD

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URL of the Trial

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Brief Summary in Lay Language

Up to now, studies on perceptual timing in subjects with ADHD were restricted on computer-based investigations, with subjects being asked to estimate or to compare the duration of visually or auditory presented stimuli. We know that children with ADHD have deficits in some of these tasks, such as time reproduction or time discrimination. For other tasks, such as time estimation or time production, results are less clear. Moreover, the causes of these deficits are not yet sufficiently understood. So far, scarce findings are based only on small samples, suggesting that abilities which contribute to timing competencies, such as internal counting and perseverance, are impaired in these children. Therefore, the aim of our study is to better understand the reasons why children with ADHD perform less well compared to children without ADHD. We want to achieve this goal by implementing different timing tasks and examining a sufficient number of children. The resultant information will serve to refine our proposed model of disturbed timing processes in children with ADHD (Marx and colleagues, 2017). In addition, it has not been investigated yet whether children with ADHD display timing deficits outside of the laboratory, i.e., while performing daily activities. Daily activities often exceed the range of a few seconds, but up to now no studies were reported on bigger time ranges. It remains unclear if children with ADHD are really impaired in perceiving time in everyday life. By means of the proposed study, we try to answer the following questions: Are the timing abilities of children with ADHD disturbed in both, the millisecond and in the second range? What are the causes of these deficits? Do motivational alterations contribute to these deficits? Do all children with ADHD have problems with all timing tasks, or do different subtypes (“timing types”) exist? If so, do these subtypes correspond to those found in children without ADHD? Do timing deficits found in the lab extend to everyday life? If so, are they caused by the same factors as in experimental tasks? Are deficits in perceptual timing associated with other clinical symptoms? In order to answer these questions, we will examine two groups of male children aged 8 – 12 years (one group with ADHD, and one group without ADHD), similar in age and intelligence, at two times of measurement. At the first appointment, the children will perform the tasks measuring abilities that we believe to cause their timing deficits (e.g., an attentional and a motivational task), and they will perform an intelligence test. At the second appointment, all children will perform the timing tasks on the computer as well as for real-life timing tasks.

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Brief Summary in Scientific Language

Studies on perceptual timing in ADHD were restricted so far on computer-based experimental investigations, with subjects being asked to estimate the duration of temporal intervals or to compare different stimuli with regard to their presentation duration. Depending on the paradigm selected, these durations must be judged or additionally manually reproduced. For some of these paradigms (time reproduction, time discrimination), there is stronger evidence for deficits in children with ADHD, whereas there is weaker evidence for others (time estimation, time production), and the causes of these deficits are not yet sufficiently understood. So far, only few regression-analytic and correlational findings exist which were mostly gathered from small samples, suggesting a role of executive (working memory, inhibition) and attention functions in the genesis of these deficits, but a large-scaled study (i.e., including all perceptual timing paradigms and a sufficiently large number of relevant predictors and subjects) is lacking so far. At this point, the proposed study enters. Based on the results of our recently published study (Marx et al., 2017) where we suggested a model of disturbed perceptual timing processes in children with ADHD, we would like to better understand the underlying determinants of these deficits by optimizing the existing predictor set and sample size. In addition, it has not been investigated so far whether children with ADHD display perceptual timing deficits outside the laboratory, i.e., while performing daily activities and beyond the range of a few seconds, such that the clinical relevance of previous experimental findings has not been proven so far. By means of the proposed study, we will try to answer the following questions: Are the perceptual timing abilities of children with ADHD disturbed both in the supra- and in the super-second range? What are the causes of these deficits? Do motivational alterations in these children contribute to their perceptual timing deficits? Do children with ADHD display a global perceptual timing deficit, or do different subtypes (“timing types”) exist? If so, do these subtypes correspond to those found in non-affected children? Are these timing deficits present in everyday life, as well? If so, are they based on the same mechanisms as in the lab, and are they associated with clinical symptoms? A quasi-experimental study with two groups of male children aged 8–12 years (ADHD; controls) matched for age and IQ at the group level and with a longitudinal design with two experimental sessions will be used to address our research questions. Whereas the first session will comprise the measurement of the predictor set and IQ testing, all children will perform the laboratory tasks and a real-life timing task in counterbalanced order at the second session.

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Do you plan to share individual participant data with other researchers?

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Description IPD sharing plan:

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Organizational Data

  •   DRKS00015760
  •   2018/10/18
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  •   yes
  •   Approved
  •   A 2018-0101, Ethik-Kommission an der Medizinischen Fakultät der Universität Rostock
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Secondary IDs

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Health Condition or Problem studied

  •   F90.0 -  Disturbance of activity and attention
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Interventions/Observational Groups

  •   male children aged 8-12 years with ADHD perform predictor tasks and timing tasks (computer, real)
  •   male children aged 8-12 years without ADHD perform predictor tasks and timing tasks (computer, real)
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Characteristics

  •   Non-interventional
  •   Observational study
  •   Non-randomized controlled trial
  •   Open (masking not used)
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  •   Other
  •   Basic research/physiological study
  •   Parallel
  •   N/A
  •   N/A
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Primary Outcome

assessment of timing abilities in children with and without ADHD by means of computer tasks and real-life tasks for the purpose of group comparison

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Secondary Outcome

N/A

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Countries of Recruitment

  •   Germany
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Locations of Recruitment

  • University Medical Center 
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Recruitment

  •   Planned
  •   2019/04/01
  •   140
  •   Monocenter trial
  •   National
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Inclusion Criteria

  •   Male
  •   8   Years
  •   12   Years
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Additional Inclusion Criteria

male children with and without ADHD aged 8-12 years

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Exclusion Criteria

IQ < 80, neurological (e.g., seizure history) or endocrine (e.g., thyroid dysfunction) disorders known to affect brain function, head injury with loss of consciousness, current depressive disorder, lifetime schizophrenia spectrum disorder, autism spectrum disorders, insufficient German language skills (lack of capacity to consent; lack of understanding the instructions)

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Addresses

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    • Universitätsmedizin Rostock, Zentrum für Nervenheilkunde, Klinik für Psychiatrie, Neurologie, Psychosomatik und Psychotherapie im Kindes- und Jugendalter
    • Gehlsheimer Straße 20
    • 18147  Rostock
    • Germany
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    • Universitätsmedizin Rostock, Zentrum für Nervenheilkunde, Klinik für Psychiatrie, Neurologie, Psychosomatik und Psychotherapie im Kindes- und Jugendalter
    • Mr.  Dr. rer. nat.  Ivo  Marx 
    • Gehlsheimer Straße 20
    • 18147  Rostock
    • Germany
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    • Universitätsmedizin Rostock, Zentrum für Nervenheilkunde, Klinik für Psychiatrie, Neurologie, Psychosomatik und Psychotherapie im Kindes- und Jugendalter
    • Mr.  Dr. rer. nat.  Ivo  Marx 
    • Gehlsheimer Straße 20
    • 18147  Rostock
    • Germany
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Sources of Monetary or Material Support

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    • Universitätsmedizin Rostock, Zentrum für Nervenheilkunde, Klinik für Psychiatrie, Neurologie, Psychosomatik und Psychotherapie im Kindes- und Jugendalter
    • Gehlsheimer Straße 20
    • 18147  Rostock
    • Germany
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Status

  •   Recruiting planned
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Trial Publications, Results and other Documents

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