Trial document




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  DRKS00009564

Trial Description

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Title

Ready to change - Promoting community readiness for physical activity among older adults

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Trial Acronym

RTC

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URL of the Trial

http://www.aequipa.de/teilprojekte/rtc.html

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Brief Summary in Lay Language

Unequal access is one important reason why preventive interventions may increase rather than reduce health inequalities between subpopulations. Community resources and networks (capacities) can play a key role in approaching diverse population groups. It has been demonstrated that tailoring physical activity (PA) interventions to stages of individual behavior change may enhance intervention reach and effectiveness. The Community Readiness concept goes beyond the individual level and applies a stage model of change to the community level. According to this concept, a certain degree of problem awareness and preplanning in the community is needed for a health promotion intervention to be successfully implemented. It is therefore recommended to assess community readiness and, if necessary, increase it before starting an intervention. As community readiness enhancing strategies such as community coalition building and networking require a lot of time and resources from all partners, an analysis of the cost-effectiveness of these participatory approaches is needed.
This study aims to the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of strategies to increase community readiness for PA intervention participation of vulnerable older adults in local environments.

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Brief Summary in Scientific Language

Unequal access is one important reason why preventive interventions may increase rather than reduce health inequalities between subpopulations. The achievement of equitable access to health promotion and prevention is therefore of major public health relevance.
It has been demonstrated that tailoring physical activity (PA) interventions to stages of individual behavior change may enhance intervention reach and effectiveness. The Community Readiness concept goes beyond the individual level and applies a stage model of change to the community level. According to this concept, a certain degree of problem awareness and preplanning in the community is needed for a health promotion intervention to be successfully implemented. It is therefore recommended to assess community readiness and, if necessary, increase it before starting an intervention. To our knowledge, the efficacy of community readiness approaches to reach vulnerable populations has not yet been systematically investigated. As community readiness enhancing strategies such as community coalition building and networking require a lot of time and resources from all partners, an analysis of the cost-effectiveness of these participatory approaches is needed.
However, even if community-based approaches increase the participation of vulnerable older adults (low socioeconomic status [SES], migrant background, men, high body mass index [BMI], low levels of PA) in PA interventions, an analysis of factors for non-participation is necessary for a thorough understanding of how access barriers to health promotion can be reduced.
This subproject investigates the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of strategies to increase community readiness for PA intervention participation of vulnerable older adults in local environments.

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Organizational Data

  •   DRKS00009564
  •   2015/11/03
  •   [---]*
  •   yes
  •   Approved
  •   06-3, Ethikkommission der Universität Bremen
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Secondary IDs

  • [---]*
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Health Condition or Problem studied

  •   physical inactivity
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Interventions/Observational Groups

  •   Intervention Group: Community Readiness enhancing strategies in 4 local communities.
    Community readiness enhancing strategies include (a) the identification of local key stakeholders, (b) information campaigns to increase problem awareness in the community, (c) the installation of a community working group on PA in older adults and (d) the recruitment of older adults for the PA intervention via local practitioners. Examples of practical strategies are: one-on-one visits with community leaders, formation of a community working group, submitting articles for local newsletters, presentation of in-depth local statistics.
  •   Control Group: Standard recruitment strategies in 4 local communities.
    Standard recruitment strategies include newspaper articles, public service advertising, and direct mailing via local residents´ registration office.
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Characteristics

  •   Interventional
  •   [---]*
  •   Randomized controlled trial
  •   Blinded
  •   patient/subject
  •   Active control (effective treament of control group)
  •   Prevention
  •   Parallel
  •   N/A
  •   N/A
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Primary Outcome

Reach: According to the RE-AIM model (Reach Efficacy Adoption Implementation Maintenance), program reach is defined as the number of program participants divided by the number of the target population in the communities.
Access equality: The number and proportion of vulnerable older adults among the participants are used as equality indicators.

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Secondary Outcome

Cost-effectiveness: Recruitment costs per participant are calculated for both recruitment strategies. For the treatment group they also include per capita shares of the overall costs of the community readiness assessment and the community readiness strategies described. The difference in costs is then divided by the difference in effects to get the incremental cost-effectiveness rate (ICER). The effect is measured in terms of participation rates and the rate of participants from vulnerable groups.

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Countries of Recruitment

  •   Germany
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Locations of Recruitment

  • other 
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Recruitment

  •   Planned
  •   2015/12/01
  •   1104
  •   Multicenter trial
  •   National
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Inclusion Criteria

  •   Both, male and female
  •   no minimum age
  •   no maximum age
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Additional Inclusion Criteria

Communities in the metropolian region Bremen-Oldenburg in the Northwest (Germany), Inclusion of 8 communities with the highest proportion of adults aged between 65-75

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Exclusion Criteria

communities outside of the metropolian region Bremen-Oldenburg in the Northwest, low porportion of adults aged between 65 and 75 years

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Addresses

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    • Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung Dienstsitz Berlin
    • Ms.  Dr.  Friederike  Bathe 
    • Friedrichstraße 130 B
    • 10117  Berlin
    • Germany
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    • Gesundheitswirtschaft Nordwest e.V.
    • Mr.  Tobias  Ubert 
    • Hinter dem Schütting 8
    • 28195  Bremen
    • Germany
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    • Leibniz-Institut für Präventionsforschung und Epidemiologie - BIPS
    • Mr.  Dirk  Gansefort 
    • Achterstraß 30
    • 28359  Bremen
    • Germany
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    • Leibniz-Institut für Präventionsforschung und Epidemiologie - BIPS
    • Mr.  Dirk  Gansefort 
    • Achterstraße 30
    • 28359  Bremen
    • Germany
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Sources of Monetary or Material Support

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    • Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung Dienstsitz Berlin
    • Friedrichstraße 130 B
    • 10117  Berlin
    • Germany
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Status

  •   Recruiting planned
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Trial Publications, Results and other Documents

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* This entry means the parameter is not applicable or has not been set.