Trial document




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  DRKS00008303

Trial Description

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Title

Body dissatisfaction in patients with Binge Eating Disorder: Cognitve and affective mechanism of maintenance.

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Trial Acronym

[---]*

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URL of the Trial

http://www.uni-tuebingen.de/de/56168

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Brief Summary in Lay Language

Individuals with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) suffer from recurrent uncontrollable eating binges. Patients are often very dissatisfied with their own body, and feel guilty and repulsive. These strong negative feelings about their own body frequently cause new eating binges. Obese individuals are often as well very dissatisfied with their own body, what leads to increased food intake. Body image and feelings about their own body are an important factor in the maintenance of BED and overweight. The improvement of body satisfaction is therefore important and necessary. This study thus aims to test the effectiveness of a training to improve body satisfaction by using interviews and questionnaires on eating und body image problems. In addition, the method of Think Aloud as well as different computer-based tasks with pupillary measurements will be used. The training in the context of this study is offered to individuals with BED and overweight individuals without BED. Participants will be randomly assigned to a training group which receives the body image training immediately and a waiting group receiving the training after 3 months.

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Brief Summary in Scientific Language

The overvaluation of shape and weight with regard to self-esteem, and body dissatisfaction are main characteristics of the Binge Eating Disorder (BED) (Wilfley, Schwartz, Spurrell, & Fairburn, 2000) and predict poor treatment results (Masheb & Grilo, 2008). According to information processing models (Williamson, White, York-Crowe, & Stewart, 2004) body dissatisfaction is caused by beliefs about one’s own body, which are represented in the body scheme and are derived from (negative) experiences in the past. These beliefs can be activated by salient stimuli, e.g. looking at one’s own or another body, and (selectively) affect processes of memory, evaluation and attention related to body stimuli (Wilson, Fairburn, Agras, Walsh, & Kraemer, 2002). Moreover, it is assumed that pathological behaviors like body checking and/or body avoidance are outcomes of these beliefs and contribute to the maintenance and increase of the negative body scheme.
First empirical studies show that women with severe eating disorder pathology display an attention bias towards their own compared to another body (Blechert, Ansorge, & Tuschen-Caffier, 2010) and towards ugly parts of their own body compared to beautiful parts (Jansen, Nederkoorn, & Mulkens, 2005). Previous work confirms these results for women with BED (Svaldi, Caffier, & Tuschen-Caffier, 2011a, 2011b). According to current research it is not clear if (a) these mechanisms are modifiable, and if (b) a modification of the described attention processes leads to an improvement of body dissatisfaction.
The current research project therefore plans to measure attentional processes in two paradigms while viewing one’s own body before and after body exposure training, which has been proven to effectively reduce body dissatisfaction (Trentowska, Bender, & Tuschen-Caffier, accepted).

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Organizational Data

  •   DRKS00008303
  •   2015/05/21
  •   [---]*
  •   yes
  •   Approved
  •   575/2014BO2, Ethik-Kommission an der Medizinischen Fakultät der Eberhard-Karls-Universität und am Universitätsklinikum Tübingen
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Secondary IDs

  • [---]*
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Health Condition or Problem studied

  •   F50.9 -  Eating disorder, unspecified
  •   E66 -  Obesity
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Interventions/Observational Groups

  •   Binge Eating Disorder - Body image training: recurrent guided body image exposures in front of the mirror, 4 sessions à 90 minutes (within 4 weeks).
  •   Binge Eating Disorder - Waiting list
  •   Obesity - Body image training: recurrent guided body image exposures in front of the mirror, 4 sessions à 90 minutes (within 4 weeks).
  •   Obesity - Waiting list
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Characteristics

  •   Interventional
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  •   Randomized controlled trial
  •   Open (masking not used)
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  •   No treatment
  •   Basic research/physiological study
  •   Parallel
  •   N/A
  •   N/A
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Primary Outcome

Two Messurements - pre and post (before and after the body image training): Eyetracking: Glance duration and frequency for beautiful and ugly body parts. Glance duration and frequency for self and control body. Saccade latency. Think Aloud method: Voice frequency and heart rate.

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Secondary Outcome

Self-report data on eating disorder symptoms and body dissatisfaction by means of questionniares:
Eating Disorder Examination (EDE-Q) and Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ).

Fragebogen zum Körperbild, FKB-20; (Clement & Löwe, 1996)Body Attitude Test, BAT; Probst, Vandereycken, Coppenolle, & Vanderlinden, 1995), Einstellungen zu Figur, Gewicht und äußerem Erscheinungsbild (FGE; Diehl, 1999), Thought Shape Fusion, TSF; und Körperkognitionsfragebogen; (Hilbert, 2000) , Impact of Weight on Quality of Life, IWQOL; Kolotkin, Head, Hamilton, & Tse, 1995; deutsche Version: Mueller et al., 2011),Body Checking Questionnaire, BCQ (Reas, Whisenhunt, Netemeyer, & Williamson, 2002; deutsche Version: Vocks, Moswald, & Legenbauer, 2008), Body Checking Cognition Scale, BCCS (Mountford, Haase, & Waller, 2006; deutsche Version: Neubauer, Bender, Tuschen-Caffier, Svaldi, & Blechert, 2010), Body Image Avoidance Questionnaire, BIAQ (Rosen, Srebnik, Saltzberg, & Wendt, 1991; deutsche Version: Legenbauer, Vocks, & Schütt-Strömel, 2007), Appearance Schemas Inventory-Revised, ASI-R (Cash, Melnyk, & Hrabosky, 2004;deutsche Version: Grocholewski, Tuschen-Caffier, Margraf, & Heinrichs, 2011)


Data collection: pre an post training, as well as 3 month after end of training (follow up).

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Countries of Recruitment

  •   Germany
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Locations of Recruitment

  • other 
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Recruitment

  •   Planned
  •   2015/06/01
  •   200
  •   Monocenter trial
  •   National
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Inclusion Criteria

  •   Female
  •   18   Years
  •   69   Years
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Additional Inclusion Criteria

BED-Group: BMI between 25 and 45 + objectve eating attacks
Obesity-Group: BMI between 25 and 45 + no objective eating attacks

General: female sex
normal or corrected vision.

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Exclusion Criteria

Insufficient German language skills, serious physical illness (e.g. cancer), current pregnancy or breastfeeding period, dyschromatopsia or serious eye disease, current alcohol/substance dependence, current hallucinations or delusions, current manic episode, Borderline personality disorder, current suicidal tendency, bulimia nervosa, current participation in other treatment studies or weight loss programs.

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Addresses

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    • Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen
    • Mr.  Prof. Dr.  Bernd  Engler 
    • Geschwister-Scholl-Platz
    • 72074  Tübingen
    • Germany
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    • Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, FB Psychologie, Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie
    • Ms.  Prof. Dr.  Jennifer  Svaldi 
    • Schleichstraße 4
    • 72076  Tübingen
    • Germany
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    • Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, FB Psychologie, Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie
    • Ms.  M. Sc.  Kerstin  Krohmer 
    • Schleichstraße 4
    • 72076  Tübingen
    • Germany
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Sources of Monetary or Material Support

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    • Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft
    • Kennedyallee 40
    • 53175  Bonn
    • Germany
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Status

  •   Recruiting ongoing
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Trial Publications, Results and other Documents

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* This entry means the parameter is not applicable or has not been set.